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2020 Corvette: Faster Costs Less Quicker Z51 a Little More

Heres Stunning Specs Behind the Fastest Corvette Ever More! Corvette Gallery from SEMA 2019 Who hasnt dreamt of how they would order themselves a brand new 2020 C8 Corvette ? And how many of us found the stunningly low $59,995 MSRP a temptation that moved the thought of owning a 2020 Corvette out of a wild dream into a possible reality? At first, I thought the winning ticket would be a base model C8 optioned with only the Z51 package and then I learned the base 2020 C8 has a higher top speed 194mph compared to 184mph. The loss in top end speed is not from parasitic drag of larger Z51 brakes or extra Z51 cooling its the rear spoiler that Chevy says adds 400 lbs. of downforce. Heres an interesting thought, how about just ordering the performance exhaust system a standalone option for a mere $1195 and see if that would be enough to make a base C8 crack the 200-mph mark. Regardless of how one wants to check the boxes on the order sheet the 2020 C8 Corvette is a modern-day mechanical marvel and thanks to our friends at Chevrolet we can reveal the specifications that make this true. This groundbreaking performance is achieved through a formula of rear weight bias, tire technology, aerodynamics, chassis tuning and of course, the powertrain. The 6.2L LT2 Small Block V-8 engine and eight-speed dual-clutch transmission are in many ways the stars of the show. Chevys Small Block Hits the Gym The LT2 is the only naturally aspirated V-8 in the segment and is SAE-certified at 495 horespower (369 kW) and 470 lb.-ft. (637 Nm) of torque when equipped with performance exhaust, making it the most-powerful entry Corvette ever.   The LT2 is one of our best efforts yet in Corvettes history of naturally aspirated high-performance small block V-8 engines, said Jordan Lee, GMs global Chief Engineer of Small Block engines. This engine is incredibly powerful and responsive. Power is readily available when the driver needs it.   The standard engine-mounted dry sump oil system boasts three scavenge pumps, which help make this the most track-capable Stingray in history. The LT2s lubrication system   keeps oil in the dry sump tank and out of the engines crankcase. It provides exceptional engine performance even at lateral acceleration levels exceeding 1g in all directions. The low-profile oil pan is high-pressure die casted similar to some of Corvettes large body structure parts to reduce mass and is only 3.5 mm thick. The LT2s pan-mounted oil filter and cooler assembly has cored oil and coolant passages, allowing for a 25 percent increase in cooling capacity over the LT1.   Much of the LT2s additional power can be attributed to how much better it breathes. The intake system is a low restriction design and incorporates identical 210mm length intake runners and an 87mm throttle body. The performance header exhaust manifolds are also low restriction and feature a stylized four-into-one design with twisted runners to allow for thermal expansion. The camshaft now has 14mm gross lift on the intake and exhaust with an increased duration for both profiles, which helps the combustion system take advantage of the extra flow capacity. The LT2 retains variable valve timing, with 62 crank degrees of cam phasing authority.   The LT2 has a very low-profile oil pan. This allows the engine to be mounted low in the vehicle for a low center of gravity and improves handling and track performance. The DCTs flywheel dampener was even reduced in diameter to allow for the lower engine position. Bespoke DCT Puts the Power Down Chevys first eight-speed dual-clutch transmission was designed to do two things put the LT2s power down and put a smile on every drivers face. The bespoke, transaxle transmission was developed with Tremec to provide uninterrupted torque delivery whether setting a new lap record or heading out on a roadtrip.   The goal from the beginning was to design a transmission worthy of an exotic supercar that is fun to drive every day, said Terri Schulke, GM global chief engineer of transmissions. We achieved that goal by combining the best attributes of the LT2 and the DCT, and I think the impressive performance numbers speak for themselves.   Engineering decided to use a dual-clutch design because it better supports the Stingrays new mid-engine architecture and desired performance. The DCT aids vehicle performance with a very low center of gravity, enables desired weight distribution and offers maximum traction under acceleration. It is a highly integrated system, as it houses the differential, final drive, controls system, sensors, lubrication and cooling hardware.   The heart of the DCT uses dual concentric wet clutches that are opened by springs and closed by hydraulic pressure. The two clutches work in tandem for uninterrupted torque delivery as they toggle between gears. A separate lube circuit is used for on-demand clutch cooling to reduce parasitic losses. Holes in the outer housing allow for the wet clutches to operate moist instead of submerged. Gear ratios were engineered to be incredibly low-end biased for maximum acceleration. First gear takes advantage of the additional traction to get off the line quickly and reach 60 mph in 2.9 seconds with the Z51 Performance Package. The Z51s 11.2 second quarter-mile acceleration is achieved by lightning-fast upshifts and excellent low-end torque. Notice the base C8 has the same ET (elapsed time) as the Z51 but is 2mph faster through the quarter mile.     The post 2020 Corvette: Faster Costs Less Quicker Z51 a Little More appeared first on Hot Rod Network .

http://www.hotrod.com/articles/2020-corvette-faster-costs-less-quicker-z51-little/

 

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